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SB4 restoration
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Frank.61



Joined: 28 Nov 2013
Posts: 108
Location: Maasmechelen, Belgium

PostPosted: Sun Mar 02, 2014 6:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Some more pics

See the original grinding marks.





Inspected the inside and tubes, which are as new (no marks whatsoever).
New oil seals are easy to get and death cheap but dust seal is another matter.
Can't get any and did contact Paioli (was for a period the licence holder of Ceriani/Forcella Italia) but they told me that although the former owner was a friend and business relation of the Paioli family, unfortunately they did not have any information and suggestion on this fork and the seals etc. Smile
Did wish me luck in getting this "iconic part of motorcycle" in it former state though Very Happy

Did contact Ariete in Italy but they did not have anything remotely usable.
Well who knows maybe someone knows a solution to the dust seal issue.

Frank Smile
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Frank.61



Joined: 28 Nov 2013
Posts: 108
Location: Maasmechelen, Belgium

PostPosted: Wed Mar 05, 2014 2:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi,

Anyone who knows what Aluminium alloys are used for the SB4 (HB2/3, KB2/3, DB1) parts?

It sound strange but for the correct de-anodise process it is apparently important to know what alloy the parts are made of.
This to make sure they don’t get “stains” (very difficult to remove). Sad

As far as I know the gusset plates (frame) and feet rest base plates are made of Avional 14 (2014A).

As told before I want to de-anodise most parts in order to be able to remove scratches etc., polish them and re-anodise them again. Rolling Eyes

Maybe someone knows something more then I do … Embarassed

Regards,

Frank
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2bims



Joined: 03 Apr 2010
Posts: 4892

PostPosted: Wed Mar 05, 2014 3:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Motorcycle specs says this for Sb4

Frame Lower cradle and connecting side plates. These plates are made from machined Avional, whilst the tubes are made from Chrome-molybdenum

http://www.motorcyclespecs.co.za/model/bimota/bimota_sb4.htm

Bimota have the distinction of making the world's most expensive motorcycles. They are handmade, bespoke creations using all the very best components. They are labour intensive to make, beautifully finished and very fast. Bimota make exclusive, expensive, luxurious sports bikes that approach motorcycle perfection, that ideal but elusive marriage between Japanese horsepower and a frame that can deliver the goods. Take one large Japanese powerplant and place it in a unique frame with the best suspension, wheels and brakes money can buy.

The SB4 is built around Suzuki's GSX1100 with the engine carried by Bimota's chrome-moly, semi-cradle that supports the motor from the sides with the top tubes unusually joining ahead of the forks and steering head for extra rigidity. The swing-arm and rising-rate, rear suspension are anchored to the frame by a huge plate of Avional 14, an aircraft quality alloy. This crucial structure is milled from a solid block, glued and then bolted in place, all in pursuit of the perfect steering head/swing-arm relation. The frame plus swing-arm weigh just 351b.It is light and low on the move with 16in wheels fitted with low-profile radial tyres. Bimota are the only company to fit radials as original equipment rubber. Suspension is by Ceriani telehydraulic forks with seven-way adjustable rebound damping and a De Carbon unit at the back. The rear rocker arm and all the linkages are lovingly made, rose joints and quality alloy details are everywhere. The motor is stock except for a four-into-two Bimota exhaust and some extremely high gearing. The tall ratios complement Bimota's aerodynamic fairing and bodywork to achieve high speed and give the GSX1100 full top end expression, ISOmph and still pulling.

The riding position is uncompromising and built for maximum speed work. The rider is stretched, fully prone, reaching down to the clip-ons across the broad back of the tank, feet high on the rearsets, knees tucked into the tank cutaways. It is cramped but strangely comfortable. Everything about the Bimota sparkles with quality. Little is cast, it is all either machined from solid or press-forged with TIG welding throughout.

The bodywork is all in fibreglass-reinforced plastic and fits like a glove. The bike exudes class and confidence. The later SB5 uses the bigger 1135cc Suzuki engine but is essentially unchanged except for a longer wheel-base and different weight distribution. The one outstanding difference is the provision of a dual seat. Previous Bimota bikes had all been strictly solo machines.

Source: The Worlds Fastest Motorcycles by Michael Scott & John Cutts
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bimotanige



Joined: 12 Jul 2010
Posts: 544
Location: yorkshire

PostPosted: Fri Mar 07, 2014 10:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Frank
Have you got the hose clips that fit into the holes on the fork sliders (lower legs) for the SB? They fit into the lug in your first picture above
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2bims



Joined: 03 Apr 2010
Posts: 4892

PostPosted: Fri Mar 07, 2014 10:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Are you needing some Nige.? I have a bag of rubber sleeved P Pipe clips for hoses if you need any...with a closed fixing lug for bolt fixing
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Frank.61



Joined: 28 Nov 2013
Posts: 108
Location: Maasmechelen, Belgium

PostPosted: Fri Mar 07, 2014 10:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Nige,

Not sure what you mean, but I do not have any hose clip, nor have I seen them (not in the parts list). Confused
My intention is to make one for myself (from stainless steel wire of 3 mm.).



Here you see Tamburini's KB2 and he has made himself an aluminium clip/bracket for the brake lines. Shocked
Could make a similar one but think it's a bit overkill (or not?)....
Mine will need only 1 eye (for the brake caliper).
But if anyone has a better proposal, I’m open for all suggestions or comments!

By the way Nige, I got a sample on the red powder coat and it struck me that if you use car polish it actually rubs of (similar to normal red car paint). Embarassed
How is that with yours?
The powder coater told me if I wanted to make it even more shiny (since powder coat would never achieve the deep gloss of normal car paint) I could use a little car polish (that’s why I did it).
And since Keith has such a beautifull gloss red on his frames I have to try to come close Very Happy
Assumed that it would not be possible to polish it like a regular car paint …..

Frank
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2bims



Joined: 03 Apr 2010
Posts: 4892

PostPosted: Fri Mar 07, 2014 11:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The "hose clip" is the one at the top of your picture...to hold the brake lines in place...although as per the Tamburini special he had twin calipers each side so a special twin line clip

HEres a rake of P hose clips

http://www.ebay.co.uk/sch/i.html?_trksid=p2055119.m570.l1313&_nkw=p+hose+clips&_sacat=0&_from=R40

And these specials are quite nice.........Black billet alloy

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/AN-8-AN8-Black-TEFLON-13-5mm-O-D-Hose-Clamp-P-Clip-/170696755973?pt=UK_CarsParts_Vehicles_CarParts_SM&hash=item27be51cb05
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bimotanige



Joined: 12 Jul 2010
Posts: 544
Location: yorkshire

PostPosted: Fri Mar 07, 2014 12:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

2Bims, they are nice those on ebay Smile
Frank, I spend more time riding and less time polishing Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy, that's what I build them for.
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waggy



Joined: 26 Sep 2011
Posts: 273
Location: Northern Ireland

PostPosted: Fri Mar 07, 2014 1:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I spend more time polishing and less time riding Sad getting to be an old dog now Crying or Very sad
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Frank.61



Joined: 28 Nov 2013
Posts: 108
Location: Maasmechelen, Belgium

PostPosted: Fri Mar 07, 2014 4:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well sofar I haven't done either of those Very Happy Very Happy
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Evilchicken0



Joined: 12 May 2010
Posts: 2692
Location: London

PostPosted: Fri Mar 07, 2014 6:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Search for a Hose separator on ebay or something like this from ProBolt
http://dev.probolt-technical.com/alloy-hose-separator-kit-black.html
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Frank.61



Joined: 28 Nov 2013
Posts: 108
Location: Maasmechelen, Belgium

PostPosted: Wed Mar 19, 2014 12:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi all,

Busy doing some small activities but nothing mayor jet. Embarassed
Nevertheless I send some pictures related to the preparations of the powder coating. Smile

Have brought the swing arm and balancer to a chemical paint stripper.
This since I had done a small spot repair on the swing arm and wanted to sand all markings away before it will go to the powder coater (also the chain “touched” the swing arm and I want to remove these markings).
Having said so, chemical paint stripping is a wonderful process (also for aluminium) since it really leaves no markings or any other proof of the fact that it was ever painted (any paint goes off: powder coat or wet paint). Surprised
It’s just like a huge dish washer similar to the ones used in restaurants, just 10 times bigger.





A beautiful “object d'art” if you see the swing arm in the nude (can look at it for hours, what a work it must have been to make it – nearly as complex as the frame) …





After having polished off all markings I will bring the frame and swing arm to my powder coater and it will receive a kind of epoxy primer and subsequently the final red coating layer.

By the way removing the bearings (in particular the steering bearings) was not as easy as I hoped: it took me a lot of force to remove those.
There was hardly any flesh to hit the outer bearing race from behind.
Wonder if others with the steel frames have similar experience?

Will make a separate topic on the restoration of the clip-on's (once fully restored with beautiful polished Stainless Steel tubes) but wanted to give you a picture of my self made puller (they were really jammed). Wink



Ciao,

Frank
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2bims



Joined: 03 Apr 2010
Posts: 4892

PostPosted: Wed Mar 19, 2014 12:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Looking good Frank...and I'm loving the green tartan backdrop...didnt realise you were from the McTavish Clan.........

I'd be interested to know how you got the clip on tubes out of the clip ons....as I'd like to change out mine also on the Db1...plain steel with flakey chrome...at least on one side...and its a bit "bent" so SS tubing would be the way to go........
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Mike Jennings



Joined: 22 Mar 2008
Posts: 282
Location: England

PostPosted: Wed Mar 19, 2014 12:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hello Frank,

it can help to run a weld bead along the inside face of a steering head bearing outer race if you're trying to remove it. When the weld cools it shrinks the race to ease removal, although re-use of the bearing's not recommended!

Cheers, MikeJ
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Frank.61



Joined: 28 Nov 2013
Posts: 108
Location: Maasmechelen, Belgium

PostPosted: Wed Mar 19, 2014 2:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Steve,

No I'm from the Mc Greenfromjealousy clan Very Happy !!
Seeing all those B's being restored to perfection in seemingly no time (N, K and you)!

No seriously, table cloth is from Italy (honestly, bought it in Como).

I will make a topic on the clip-on's with all details in.
Mine was bent (right-side) as result of a fall) as also the chrome was far from perfect (and it is in direct view). Sad
Former owners have apparently tried to “rectify” it and have put the aluminium clamps in a bench vice, which predictably resulted in marked/damaged aluminium parts Mad

So: first get those tubes out of the aluminium "part" which is easy if you use a simple hydraulic press and a socket (diameter smaller then the 22 mm. of the tube).
You do not have to use anything else and they come out completely undamaged. Cool
if you want, you could heat her up a little with a butane or propane torch, but be careful since aluminium doesn't warn when it is to hot (no discoloration to warn you).
Again can give you all pics you want (PM me if so) and it is really easy!
I will de-anodize the parts (by a professional company – not yet done) then polish them and have them anodized again and afterwards the Stainless Steel tubes pressed in (did cost me 70 euro's delivered for the 2 SS tubes from D-R-T- Armin Schneider directly not via eBay ….. not to much I think). Wink

If I can do anything let me know (IOY big time)!

Frank
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