Bimota Forum Forum Index Bimota Forum
Forum for Bimota Owners and Riders
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in  

DB1 restoration
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Bimota Forum Forum Index -> DB Series
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
CBR_DBR



Joined: 19 Sep 2015
Posts: 23
Location: Canberra Australia

PostPosted: Fri Oct 26, 2018 4:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Rocketron,

My Bimota is a DB5R (so a lot newer) and I'm certainly no expert on the DB1 but do have Ducatis from the era with the Pantah engine. As you have discovered, Ducati likes to talk about their history but they don't always want to provide you with parts to keep it going. Smile

Belts for the Pantah are easy to come by, however, and a trawl on the net will get you the numbers. One of the major suppliers of quality belts is California Cycleworks. Lots of aftermarket businesses supply them and if you can get a pair of those you won't go wrong. http://ca-cycleworks.com/ca-cycleworks-products/timing-belts?make=170&model=332

Measure the O-ring for your clutch piston carefully. Over the life of the Pantah engine Ducati changed the spec at least three times. This means that, if you find a Ducati part number, that may not be right one for your engine.

I'm loving your report on the progress and the DB1 is looking really nice!

Cheers,

Mike [/url][/u]
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Rocketron



Joined: 12 Jan 2013
Posts: 63
Location: Canada

PostPosted: Fri Oct 26, 2018 7:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Starting to think I should buy a basket-case vintage bike to restore! My modelling/painting skills are proving to be useful. Hopefully I can get all the little bits back inside.



Wheels went to the dealer for new tires. I twiddled the bearings in the wheels and they felt smooth to me. Asked the service rep to give their opinion too. I'm thinking they will be good to go. But I'll listen to what the service rep says first.
Moved the swing-arm up and down, side to side and it moves smooth too. I'll try to see if there is a way to grease the bushes without total dis-assembly.
Yea, it probably would be good to check valve clearances before trying to fire it up. No plan to remove the heads however, that's why I bought the endoscope.

Timing belts are waiting at the Ducati dealer for me to pick-up. They told me the o-ring for the slave cylinder is no longer a Ducati part. I spent some time reading about o-rings which are made to be compatible with DOT4 brake fluid. Planning on taking it to an Auto parts store and rolling it across the counter. See what they can do before trying to find it on-line.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Rocketron



Joined: 12 Jan 2013
Posts: 63
Location: Canada

PostPosted: Fri Oct 26, 2018 7:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bought some fuel line today.





Thought I would measure the carb inlet flanges to see what size rubber elbow might fit. Although with the comment from DB1 860 about running for years without them does make me not worry so much.

Surprise! They hacked them off Razz


Also there is only one hole exposed on the carb inlet....




Apparently if I add air cleaners, I'll have to work with the bell-mouths attached. 84mm or 3.3 inches, I've found some silicon 45` hoses just slightly smaller. No rush for this, I'll just keep exploring options for a while.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
PaulDB2



Joined: 26 Apr 2014
Posts: 265
Location: Manchester

PostPosted: Fri Oct 26, 2018 4:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi RocketRon,
when checking the swinging arm for play be aware the swing arm is shimmed so you need to check for lateral movement along the swing arm pin. Mine had worn enough to need the next thickness up and of course Ducati shims are the wrong diameter. Bimota Classic Parts supplied my replacements or maybe a helpful engineering shop could turn some out should you need them. Good luck.
_________________
Bimota DB1, Bimota YB5, Bimota YB6 Exup, Bimota YB9 SR, Ducati NCR Replica, 1997 Ducati 900SS, Honda CR750 race replica
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Rocketron



Joined: 12 Jan 2013
Posts: 63
Location: Canada

PostPosted: Sat Oct 27, 2018 9:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

O-rings are more diverse than I knew.

This o-ring in the clutch slave housing is probably metric. Careful measurement shows it to have an internal diameter of 26mm and a cross section of 4mm.

I wrote this before receiving the O-rings in question. They were the wrong size. Subsequent studying of the various sizes caused me to re-evaluate my original guess that Ducati used metric o-rings.


Not the greatest picture for comparison purposes due to the shadows but you can see that the -214 is very close to the original. The 26X4mm is too large to fit in the cylinder without folding over.
For those who may not know (like myself until a little while ago) In North America these are referred to as dash (-) numbers. In Britain they are BS numbers. Probably British Standard, which seems a safe guess. I wasn't interested enough to try to learn if there is some sort of system to the numbering. Seemed pretty random when only giving a cursory look.
For my purposes, the -214 fit quite nicely. After a little bleeding the clutch seems to be working well. I won't give it a passing grade until I have the motor running.

Of the several types of material it is probably EPDM (ethylene propylene diene monomer) which is best. There are two sub-types, one of which is cured with peroxide. this gives it a slightly greater operating temperature range. The standard are rated from –45°C to +120°C. Which seems quite adequate for a clutch slave cylinder.
The resistance to DOT 3 and 4 brake fluids are what makes this the best choice for this application.

Having narrowed down the requirement to this type o-ring, procuring next became the area of discovery. Chances of buying one single o-ring are slim. I could have become the world supplier for old Ducati Pantah clutch slave cylinder o-rings. Of course only in the 26 x 4 size. Being not sure of the market for these I decided not to buy literally hundreds of them.
Finally found an online retailer who would sell me "only" 25. Soon I may have some to spare if others should want one. My price was $0.66 each.

As you may imagine I have quite a selection of o-rings in bags, all of them the EPDM variety. Procuring them locally was quite easy as they are not metric. Might be different in other parts of the world.


Last edited by Rocketron on Sun Dec 30, 2018 12:31 am; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Rocketron



Joined: 12 Jan 2013
Posts: 63
Location: Canada

PostPosted: Sun Nov 11, 2018 6:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wheels returned from the Dealer.



Apparently Shinko tires are not a big seller in Canada, in these sizes.

The final digits in the DOT number indicate date of manufacture. First two are the week of the year. Final two digits are the year.




Timing belts also were installed. If set approximately at 5 lbs tension on the tensioning roller, it seemed to set the tension correctly using the 5mm allen key check method.





Finally for today, is there a trick to removing these quick release pins from the body work? Plan is to paint the red and green stripes. But I'd like to get one of these pins out of the way before beginning to sand.
Contemplating the paint work, it appears to be lacquer. I'm familiar with painting base and clear, not so sure about lacquer.

https://www.autopaint-pro.co.uk/1l-bimota-paints-waterbased-3785-p.asp



Found this supplier for paint, the numbers correspond to Lechler paint numbers for Bimotas. Can't see any actual colour samples though. More research required...


Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
PaulDB2



Joined: 26 Apr 2014
Posts: 265
Location: Manchester

PostPosted: Sun Nov 11, 2018 4:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The quarter-turn body fasteners on the DB1 are Camloc 4002. There is a link here on how to install them, de-install is just the reverse, the tricky bit is getting a pick to unhook the snap ring from the grommet.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4TbUow44AMs
I did splash out on the pin installation pliers (not expensive) and the snap ring installer (very expensive for what it is!). Likely to be available from military or aircraft tool suppliers, I used LAS Aerospace Ltd in the UK.
Good luck.
_________________
Bimota DB1, Bimota YB5, Bimota YB6 Exup, Bimota YB9 SR, Ducati NCR Replica, 1997 Ducati 900SS, Honda CR750 race replica
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Rocketron



Joined: 12 Jan 2013
Posts: 63
Location: Canada

PostPosted: Sun Nov 11, 2018 9:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Much thanks to you PaulDB2

https://www.aircraftspruce.ca/categories/aircraft_parts/ap/menus/ha/fast_tools_camloc.html
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Rocketron



Joined: 12 Jan 2013
Posts: 63
Location: Canada

PostPosted: Tue Nov 13, 2018 10:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I would have thought the subject of the gold / bronze coloured hardware (bolts) on the DB1 at least, would have been talked about. However my search attempts can't find anything.

Is there a known source for these?

Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
2bims



Joined: 03 Apr 2010
Posts: 5854

PostPosted: Tue Nov 13, 2018 11:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The gold finish is merely zinc passivation....the "special" bolts are called "low head" button allen key bolts...….Which you may not think important...but the "low head" part means they fit flat and square in many milled recesses as Bimota intended...as opposed to the head of the bolt standing proud...


https://www.ebay.co.uk/sch/i.html?_from=R40&_trksid=m570.l1313&_nkw=low+head+allen+bolts&_sacat=0

The zinc plating by electrolysis provided a sacrificial rust protective coating...and the shiney gold colour....Not really done so much anymore as there are so many grades of SS bolts available
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Quadrasuarass



Joined: 23 Aug 2013
Posts: 55
Location: New Zealand

PostPosted: Tue Nov 13, 2018 11:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Plating standard that can be used is AS 1789, I used the following specification in this standard to achieve the quality in the picture: AS1789 Fe/Zn 25cC which equates to Zinc Plated, Chrome Passivated (Gold not clear) to 25 microns. 25 microns is the thickest coating listed in the standard and is suitable for this type of work. You will need to find a tame electroplater who understands all this and has a set up for individually jigging each item (wiring onto a frame rather than barrel plating). Fortunately there is a strong Hot Rod scene where i live and a local plater who is prepared to support the petrol heads. the lot below cost NZD10.

For your cap screws with the 'thin head' they are referred to as a 'Low Head" socket cap screw and are available in a range of sizes. I sourced what I needed through EDL fasteners in NZ:
http://www.edlfast.co.nz/products/index.php/m10-x-12-low-hd-socket-cap-screw-plain.html

Then get them plated.

More data here
https://www.fastenal.com/content/product_specifications/M.LHSCS.10.9.BO.pdf

Dimensions: DIN 7984
• Threads: 6g
• Material &
Mechanical Properties: ISO 898-1; Class 10.9
• Marking: Manufacturer ID and 010.9 on sizes 5mm Nominal diameter and
larger
• Finish: Black Oxide (Thermal or Chemical)
• Material Test Reports: The MTR must have documented lot traceability, dimensional
results, full chemical test results and full mechanical test results
to the specification(s) above. In addition, the MTR shall be in full
compliance with Fastenal’s MTR Requirements.
• Quality Assurance
Provisions: Category 3 of ASME B18.18

You will need to clean up old fasteners before re plating - wire brush or wheel works well.



All the best with the resto; I am enjoying this thread.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Rocketron



Joined: 12 Jan 2013
Posts: 63
Location: Canada

PostPosted: Wed Nov 14, 2018 9:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks again... ask and you will be educated.

https://www.caswellcanada.ca/copy-cad-zinc-plating-kit.html

Seems not so difficult if you want to do it yourself. Cost for a few bolts is a little high but it's a possibility...
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Rocketron



Joined: 12 Jan 2013
Posts: 63
Location: Canada

PostPosted: Sun Dec 30, 2018 12:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've been occupied doing things which have kept me away from here and the bike. I've had time to do a few things but nothing as dedicated as I was.

Thanks to PaulDB2, I was able to quickly find and procure these.

I've only used the pliers to remove one of the body work fasteners but they work slick. I think the tapered tool will make re-installing the socket part of the fastener much easier, than would be the case with out it.

The rear shock arrived back from it's rebuild. Ellis reported that the oil inside was beyond replacement time. The seal was replaced. He found the shaft had some marks below where it would not pass through the seal. It seems it passed through inspection at the Marzocchi factory without being rejected. Our assumption is, because the marks were below the seal it was "Good enough" "abbastanza buono"?
There was much back and forth about the bump stop. Ellis was able to adapt an Ohlins part to fit. All of this proved quite expensive given the value of the stock shock. If I were to do this over at a later time, this would be something I would upgrade to a new shock. Still keep to old one in a box for the next owner however.



If you were to look back slightly you would find I edited my posting about the o-ring in the clutch slave cylinder.
The clutch is now together and functioning.
Plan for this week is to buy a battery and see how the electrical system reacts to having electrons coursing through it. If that goes ok, I'll find out if the carburettors will hold fuel.
Getting close to finding out if it'll make a loud noise!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
2bims



Joined: 03 Apr 2010
Posts: 5854

PostPosted: Sun Dec 30, 2018 11:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nice to see it coming back together......If you dont already know.....or have forgotten....The battery isn't a straight fit...being a bimota why would it be?...you have to undo the Oil cooler fastenings so that it lowers down out of the way.....then undo the battery box fixings and pull that down and out where the gap now is where the oil cooler was...install the battery in the box...being sure + tive and - tive are in the right alignment....then install the battery box with battery in it and then refix the oil cooler
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Rocketron



Joined: 12 Jan 2013
Posts: 63
Location: Canada

PostPosted: Wed Jan 16, 2019 2:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Moving onto the final phases before trying to fire it up.

Changing the oil and filter. Put some down the cylinders too, then rotated the motor by turning the back wheel.






The battery arrived and slipped in like it was made for the bike.


Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Bimota Forum Forum Index -> DB Series All times are GMT + 1 Hour
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10  Next
Page 6 of 10

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group

The Bimota Forum has no official connection to Bimota S.p.A.. We just ride or are interested in their motorcycles and support the brand. All trademarks are acknowledged