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Db6 marzzochi oil

 
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Xarly



Joined: 02 Jul 2017
Posts: 26
Location: Spain

PostPosted: Wed Jul 19, 2017 7:33 pm    Post subject: Db6 marzzochi oil Reply with quote

Please, what is the qty. of oil sae 7.5 un the delirio db6 2007?

Cc2? Cm?

Thanks!
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quikduk



Joined: 13 Aug 2016
Posts: 182
Location: Southern California, USA

PostPosted: Fri Jul 21, 2017 12:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Xarly,

I checked every manual I have for the bike and nowhere does it list the capacity for any fluid (engine oil, fork oil, etc.).

My suggestion is that you drain one fork leg by hanging it upside down over a container with measurements (Ratio Rite, etc.) or over a standard container and then calculate the volume to replace.

I would also do the other leg as they cannot be more than 1 to 2 cc's off between the legs or you will get "pull" under compression.

Let us know what you find out.
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quikduk



Joined: 13 Aug 2016
Posts: 182
Location: Southern California, USA

PostPosted: Fri Jul 21, 2017 12:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The other option is to measure the oil level with the cap off but the spring in the tube, then remove the spring slowly so that most of the oil remains in the tube and then take another measurement.

The measurements are from the top machined edge of the fork tube down until you contact the fluid. It is best done with the forks off the bike and in a perfect vertical position, otherwise you need to take the measurement from the top down to the fluid but on the side of the tube to approximate the level height.

I don't know if there is an easier way.

Also, I have never used 7.5Wt oil but rather 10Wt.

Regards
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Xarly



Joined: 02 Jul 2017
Posts: 26
Location: Spain

PostPosted: Sat Jul 22, 2017 7:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sorry, but my bimota db6 is a front crash, and he has not oil
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barnmankit



Joined: 23 Nov 2014
Posts: 81
Location: Pyrenees, France

PostPosted: Sat Jul 22, 2017 7:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Have you tried contacting Marzocchi?
_________________
1998 Bimota DB2 edizione finale naked
1976 BMW R75/6 tractor
Challenge Seiran recumbent bicycle
Numerous other bicycles

"We're each given one small grain of madness - if we lose it, we're nothing." Robin Williams
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Xarly



Joined: 02 Jul 2017
Posts: 26
Location: Spain

PostPosted: Sun Jul 23, 2017 5:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

barnmankit wrote:
Have you tried contacting Marzocchi?


No, what is the model of the marzocchi fork db6 delirio?

I read ni this forum this

7.5 sae Marzocchi, approx 665cc, measured 135mm from top tube (without springs and spacers)
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quikduk



Joined: 13 Aug 2016
Posts: 182
Location: Southern California, USA

PostPosted: Mon Jul 24, 2017 7:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have taken excerpts from both the Race Tech website as well as the DB6 manual for your use in setting up your soon to be rebuilt forks...once you figure out for certain how much fluid is required.

The DB6 uses a 50mm diameter Marzocchi upside-down (USD) cartridge fork.

Here goes:

On upside-down forks there is sometimes a gap between the inner and outer fork tubes (between the fork bushings). On most KYB and WP forks there is no Equalizing Hole in the inner (chrome) fork tube. Showa forks have an Equalizing Hole. Without this hole, the problem is not knowing how much fork oil is actually in this area. This must be considered when oil level is given as a distance (mm) instead of a volume (cc). To set the oil level correctly using (the Race Tech) method you must remove all oil in this area.
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quikduk



Joined: 13 Aug 2016
Posts: 182
Location: Southern California, USA

PostPosted: Mon Jul 24, 2017 7:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Invert the fork and pour oil into the top of the fork. Stroke the damping rod to bleed the cartridge. Continue to stroke until all bubbles in the cartridge are gone and it strokes smoothly and evenly. You can speed up the process of filling the cartridge by placing your hand over the open end of the upper fork tube while the fork is extended and pressing downward on the fork. The increase in pressure will quickly force the oil into the lower cartridge.

Set the Race Tech Oil Level Tool (TFOL 02) - (basically a graduated syringe of sorts) to the correct level according to the manual. Bottom the Outer Fork Tube as well as the Damping Rod. To set the oil level suck out the excess oil with the Oil Level Tool. Repeat by extending the Outer Tube all the way, collapsing it and sucking out the excess.

You could forgo the tool and use a stainless metric ruler (long and thin) to measure the distance with the forks collapsed as described above.
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quikduk



Joined: 13 Aug 2016
Posts: 182
Location: Southern California, USA

PostPosted: Mon Jul 24, 2017 7:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

And now from the Bimota OM:

FRONT SUSPENSION ADJUSTMENT:

Spring pre-load adjustment: To adjust the spring pre-load, turn the adjuster with a 22 mm wrench.

To Decrease pre-load (soft): Turn the adjuster counter clockwise for light loads and normal riding on flat roads in good conditions.

To Increase pre-load (hard): Turn the adjuster clockwise for a riding in more severe conditions.

To set the pre-load in the standard position:
- 1. Turn the adjuster clockwise till the end of its run.
- 2. Turn the adjuster counter clockwise for 7.5 turns.
- 3. Be certain to adjust the right and the left forks to the same settings.

Rebound damping force adjustment: The rebound damping force adjuster is located at the top of the front fork (2). Count the number of turn from fully turned-in position (clockwise).

To Decrease damping force (soft): Turn the adjuster counter clockwise for light loads and normal riding on flat roads in good conditions.

To Increase damping force (hard): Turn the adjuster clockwise for a riding in more severe conditions.

To set the pre-load in the standard position:
- 1. Turn the adjuster clockwise till the end of its run.
- 2. Turn the adjuster counter clockwise for 2 turns.
- 3. Be certain to adjust the right and the left forks to the same settings.

Compression damping force adjustment: The compression damping force adjuster is located at the bottom of the front fork (3). Count the number of turns from fully turned-in position (clockwise).

To Decrease damping force (soft): Turn the adjuster counter clockwise for light loads and normal riding on flat roads in good conditions.

To Increase damping force (hard): Turn the adjuster clockwise for a riding in more severe conditions.

To set the pre-load in the standard position:
- 1. Turn the adjuster clockwise till the end of its run.
- 2. Turn the adjuster counter clockwise for 1.5 turns.
- 3. Be sure to adjust the right and the left forks to the same settings.
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quikduk



Joined: 13 Aug 2016
Posts: 182
Location: Southern California, USA

PostPosted: Mon Jul 24, 2017 7:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

...and for the rear shock:

REAR SUSPENSION ADJUSTMENT:

Spring pre-load adjustment: The adjustment can be performed by changing the adjuster nut position with an 8 mm wrench.

Decrease pre-load (soft): Turn the adjuster nut clockwise for light loads and normal riding on flat roads in good conditions.

Increase pre-load (hard): Turn the adjuster counter clockwise for a riding in more severe conditions. The standard setting for spring pre-load is 10 mm.

Rebound damping force adjustment: The rebound damping force adjuster is located at the top of the rear shock (2). As you turn the adjuster you will notice clicks. Count the number of clicks from fully turned-in position (clockwise).

Decrease damping force (soft): Turn the adjuster counter clockwise for light loads and normal riding on flat roads in good conditions.

Increase damping force (hard): Turn the adjuster clockwise for a riding in more severe conditions.

To set the pre-load in the standard position:
- 1. Turn the adjuster clockwise till the end of its run.
- 2. Turn the adjuster counter clockwise for 10 clicks.

Compression damping force adjustment: The compression damping force adjuster is located at the bottom of the rear shock (3). As you turn the adjuster you will notice clicks. Count the number of clicks from fully turned-in position (clockwise).

Decrease damping force (soft): Turn the adjuster counter clockwise for light loads and normal riding on flat roads in good conditions.

Increase damping force (hard): Turn the adjuster clockwise for a riding in more severe conditions.

To set the pre-load in the standard position:
- 1. Turn the adjuster clockwise till the end of its run.
- 2. Turn the adjuster counter clockwise for 10 clicks.

WARNING: The rear shock is equipped with a high pressure nitrogen reservoir. Do not try to disassemble or repair it.
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quikduk



Joined: 13 Aug 2016
Posts: 182
Location: Southern California, USA

PostPosted: Mon Jul 24, 2017 7:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Xarly wrote:
barnmankit wrote:
Have you tried contacting Marzocchi?


No, what is the model of the marzocchi fork db6 delirio?

I read (in) this forum this:

7.5 SAE (Wt.?) Marzocchi, approx 665cc, measured 135mm from top tube (without springs and spacers)


So you are saying that there is 665cc's of 7.5 Wt. fork fluid per leg and/or this equates to filling the fork leg until it measures 135mm from the top of the fork tube?

That equates to (for UK/USA) about .58/.70 quarts of fluid per leg (I like the cc better).

The question is, can you stroke (easy there guys Laughing ) the fork inner and outer tube to purge all air and allow fluid to all areas, then collapse and measure or do you perform that process and measure with the fork leg fully extended?

I don't see how you can measure with the cartridge installed as it would be in the way. Maybe there is a good motorcycle suspension shop near you that can help.

This will be good info as I want to change my fork fluid out soon. Cool
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Xarly



Joined: 02 Jul 2017
Posts: 26
Location: Spain

PostPosted: Mon Jul 24, 2017 8:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

quikduk wrote:
Xarly wrote:
barnmankit wrote:
Have you tried contacting Marzocchi?


No, what is the model of the marzocchi fork db6 delirio?

I read (in) this forum this:

7.5 SAE (Wt.?) Marzocchi, approx 665cc, measured 135mm from top tube (without springs and spacers)


So you are saying that there is 665cc's of 7.5 Wt. fork fluid per leg and/or this equates to filling the fork leg until it measures 135mm from the top of the fork tube?

That equates to (for UK/USA) about .58/.70 quarts of fluid per leg (I like the cc better).

The question is, can you stroke (easy there guys Laughing ) the fork inner and outer tube to purge all air and allow fluid to all areas, then collapse and measure or do you perform that process and measure with the fork leg fully extended?

I don't see how you can measure with the cartridge installed as it would be in the way. Maybe there is a good motorcycle suspension shop near you that can help.

This will be good info as I want to change my fork fluid out soon. Cool



Thank you very much for your help, it has been very useful to return to leave the standard settings


To check the oil level, I used the following tool, first by pouring 665cc of oil and then measuring the air chamber. The oil has been poured into the inner bar and then purged by moving the hydraulic
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Xarly



Joined: 02 Jul 2017
Posts: 26
Location: Spain

PostPosted: Mon Jul 24, 2017 8:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

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quikduk



Joined: 13 Aug 2016
Posts: 182
Location: Southern California, USA

PostPosted: Wed Jul 26, 2017 9:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

That is a good tool. It should allow you to get close. I would use what you removed as a guide.

From my past history fiddling with bike suspension, besides your adjustment ranges, you need to take into account the spring rate, your weight (with all of your riding gear on), and your riding style (that you will be predominately using on this bike - i.e. race or road riding).

If the roads you typ. ride on are beat up pieces of crap, that too will have some impact on how you setup your suspension.

I'll post a link to some good info re: setting up motorcycle suspensions. It isn't rocket science but just common sense and knowing what adjustment should yield what result. The rest is fine tuning by you on the road in increments.
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quikduk



Joined: 13 Aug 2016
Posts: 182
Location: Southern California, USA

PostPosted: Wed Jul 26, 2017 9:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ok. Go to www.feelthetrack.com

Dave Moss is well known for his suspension work and clinics. He has lots of YouTube videos with links on this website. He tells you what does what, what you should feel and what not to do when setting up your suspension.

I am following his videos and will be dialing in my DB6 suspension myself soon...if I can ever get a break from work! Rolling Eyes

There is a lot of misinformation on the internet but his work and recommendations are totally proven time and time again. Major race teams use his easy to understand explanations to help get accurate feedback from their riders above and beyond their telemetry reports.

Sensors may say one thing but the "keister-meter" never lies.
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